One more lesson judith ortiz cofer

She gave us character description, places, and dialogue. It was not until years later that I had stopped hating that teacher for not understanding that I had been betrayed by a classmate, and by my inability to read her warning on the board.

All the gifts they got were extravagant, not gifts that her friends would usually get. She remembers Christmas, and how her family celebrated the holidays.

She narrates hers tory of how she had to go to the bathroom, and she asked one of the students how she could ask the teacher. One thing that she had difficulties with was assimilating to the language.

Being a Latino myself, I understand her love for traditions similar to the ones she describes. Judith remembers when they got a telegram in the spring from her dad. Judith did a job well done on her essay. Her narrative self is strongly influenced by oral storytelling, which was inspired by her grandmother, an able storyteller in the tradition of teaching through storytelling among Puerto Rican women.

People here discriminated against her and her family because of where they were from. They did not like to show their gifts off; instead they put them away to avoid getting envied.

Judith Ortiz Cofer

Her work also explores such subjects as racism and sexism in American culture, machismo and female empowerment in Puerto Rican culture, and the challenges diasporic immigrants face in a new culture.

She describes with much detail some of the Christmas traditions she had back at home. After moving from Puerto Rico to the United States, having to learn English, and be forced to forget her customs and way of living to please her father, she had a very hard time adapting to all of these changes that are only bringing misery to her life.

In Puerto Rico, Judith was considered superior to society. On the other hand, her mother looked more Spanish than her dad. The apartment is located above a candy store owned and ran by a Jewish man Mr. I would perceive this personal essay to be successful, but not very successful.

The ending was very abrupt and did not lead the reader to a satisfying conclusion in my opinion. To Judith it felt strange, because Puerto Ricans are known for being loud, not quiet.

The description the author used was great. Her father had fair skin, spoke perfect English, and his navy uniform were good reasons to explain why they were not a typical Puerto Rican family. A Puerto Rican wife was known to reflect the light and dark sides of her husband.

In school, she encountered English, which became her functional language and the language she wrote in. It almost seems as if she enjoyed being in Puerto Rico more than the U.

This is one of the main points discussed when writing a personal essay. Her Latino heritage was very important to her, and the fear of being judged had driven her father to toss it all away. Although, she did turn back around stronger after her experience.

One thing that may have contributed to this was that I felt very identified with her. In my personal essay I discussed how life was before Katrina, how it changed during Katrina, and also how life changed when I had to leave New Orleans and relocate to another city.

Judith Ortiz starts off describing the good life she had in Puerto Rico by discussing how she would receive dolls and gifts for Christmas, and how the family would all get together and have a celebration, which made her happy. Early in her life, Ortiz Cofer realized her "main weapon in life was communication," and to survive, she would have to become fluent in the language spoken where she lived.Sep 07,  · Judith Ortiz Cofer goes into great details about her childhood in “One More Lesson.” Back in the s and s the United States was considered a “melting pot,” because everyone came here to achieve the American dream.

Sep 11,  · Judith Ortiz Cofer is basically saying that language is a very powerful weapon.

Without knowing the language that is predominantly spoken, one may experience a real hard time and may even be punished as shown in the story when the teacher became angry with her and hit her on the head with the book. Judith Ortiz Cofer (February 24, – December 30, ) was a Puerto Rican American author.

Her critically acclaimed and award-winning work spans a range of literary genres including poetry, short stories, autobiography, essays, and. Sep 05,  · In Judith Ortiz Cofer’s personal essay, “One More Lesson”, she expresses the idea that life is filled with obstacles that could change your life from one moment to another and how you must overcome them to find happiness.

One More Lesson” Judith Ortiz Cofer’s “One More Lesson” is about her growing up in Puerto Rico with her family while her father was in the Navy. When her father was shipped to Paterson, New Jersey, he sent for them to move there in a little barrio along with him; Judith didn’t like this at all.

Sep 06,  · Judith Ortiz Cofer’s “One More Lesson” is about her growing up in Puerto Rico with her family while her father was in the Navy. When her father was shipped to Paterson, New Jersey, he sent for them to move there in a little barrio along with him; Judith didn’t like this at all.

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One more lesson judith ortiz cofer
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